Brute Reason

A collection of thoughts about psychology, social justice, and anything else I give a shit about. freethoughtblogs.com/brutereason

Topics: feminism / psychology / lgbtq / sex / politics / abortion / health / mental illness / language / depression / sexism / sexual assault / fashion / racism / education / social justice

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magusworkshop:

wilwheaton:

thisistheverge:

New York Comic Con apologizes after hijacking attendees’ Twitter accounts
When visitors registered their badges for New York Comic Con, they were asked if they wanted to connect a Twitter or Facebook account. But if they did, they got more than they bargained for. The convention organizers began quietly sending automatic tweets from attendees’ accounts, posting conversational-sounding promotional messages with the #NYCC hashtag. The messages, collected here by Mashable, directed readers to NYCC’s Facebook page, and the affected users quickly started complaining that they’d never sent the tweets. 

On the one hand, what did you expect would happen when you connected a social media account? On the other hand, what NYCC did was really douchey.

On one hand this is an obvious violation of the ethical concept of privacy and voice purity - that a person should represent themselves and themselves only. On the other hand, this is a huge security hole that Twitter should patch because no one should be able to send tweets automatically without your authorization every tweet, not some kind of blanket permission.
No one should have, no one did have, the expectation that NYCC would tweet for them without their direct permission on every tweet because no one else has ever done it - it’s awful. To imply that “they should have known” not only squicks me as victim blamey it’s also partially absolving the people who fucked up here - NYCC - for fucking up. No, it’s not the user’s fault they were appropriated for marketing, it’s the marketer’s fault for appropriating people to begin with.

Um, what? I would expect an organization or conference that I’m giving tons of money to in order to attend to treat me with enough respect not to use my online accounts for promotional purposes without my explicit permission. That’s what I would “expect to happen.”
People connect Twitter and Facebook to other services all the time. I connected mine to Tumblr, Buffer, Pocket, and a bunch of other stuff. 99% of the time it works out fine. 1% of the time somebody is a douchebag, and it’s not the user. View high resolution

magusworkshop:

wilwheaton:

thisistheverge:

New York Comic Con apologizes after hijacking attendees’ Twitter accounts

When visitors registered their badges for New York Comic Con, they were asked if they wanted to connect a Twitter or Facebook account. But if they did, they got more than they bargained for. The convention organizers began quietly sending automatic tweets from attendees’ accounts, posting conversational-sounding promotional messages with the #NYCC hashtag. The messages, collected here by Mashable, directed readers to NYCC’s Facebook page, and the affected users quickly started complaining that they’d never sent the tweets. 

On the one hand, what did you expect would happen when you connected a social media account? On the other hand, what NYCC did was really douchey.

On one hand this is an obvious violation of the ethical concept of privacy and voice purity - that a person should represent themselves and themselves only. On the other hand, this is a huge security hole that Twitter should patch because no one should be able to send tweets automatically without your authorization every tweet, not some kind of blanket permission.

No one should have, no one did have, the expectation that NYCC would tweet for them without their direct permission on every tweet because no one else has ever done it - it’s awful. To imply that “they should have known” not only squicks me as victim blamey it’s also partially absolving the people who fucked up here - NYCC - for fucking up. No, it’s not the user’s fault they were appropriated for marketing, it’s the marketer’s fault for appropriating people to begin with.

Um, what? I would expect an organization or conference that I’m giving tons of money to in order to attend to treat me with enough respect not to use my online accounts for promotional purposes without my explicit permission. That’s what I would “expect to happen.”

People connect Twitter and Facebook to other services all the time. I connected mine to Tumblr, Buffer, Pocket, and a bunch of other stuff. 99% of the time it works out fine. 1% of the time somebody is a douchebag, and it’s not the user.

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    I’d have expected something between being tweeted at by bots to being “checked in” a la foursquare, or maybe stuff at...
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